Jan 14, 2009

Baked Tostones





Shhh, don't tell my daughter these aren't fried! If I can fool her, then these passed the test. She loves tostones, and got so happy when she saw me making them, I kinda felt bad because I said, she'll know something is different, she always does! But she ate them without a peep and even said how good they were.

Fried tostones, aka patacones depending on what country you are from are fried green plantains, the latin equivalent to french fries in America. Usually a treat I occasionally allow myself because they are not exactly low in fat. But now I will be eating these a lot more. They are just as good as the fried ones without all the points. The trick is to bake them until they are brown. Serve them as an appetizer with mojo or guacamole for dipping or eat them as a side dish with rice and beans.

Baked Tostones
Gina's Weight Watcher Recipes
Servings: 4 Size: 1/4th Cook Time: 30 minutes Old Points: 3 pts • Points+: 4
  • 3 medium (3 cups) green plantains
  • 2 tsp canola oil
  • salt
  • Pam spray

Preheat the oven to 400°. Spray baking sheet with cooking spray.

Peel plantains and slice into 1/2 thick slices. Place in a bowl and toss with oil and salt. Arrange slices on the baking sheet. Lightly coat with a little more oil spray on top and bake for 10 minutes or until slightly brown on the bottom. Remove from oven.

Using a tostonera (a press), slightly mash each piece to about a quarter of an inch thick. If a tostonera is not available, insert the pieces between a folded piece of brown-paper and press down using a saucer or the bottom of a glass jar.

Lightly re-spray the baking sheet and place the plantains brown side up onto the baking sheet. Lightly spray the top and bake for another 15 minutes until golden brown and crispy.


Mojo Garlic Dipping Sauce


A pungent dipping sauce with garlic, cumin, oregano and sour orange juice or a combination of orange and lime juices. A little goes a long way.
Servings: 4 • Calories: 30.1 Old Points: .5 pt • Points+: 1 pt

  • 1/3 cup sour orange juice (or 1/4 cup fresh squeezed orange juice + 1 tbsp lime juice)
  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • 1 large clove garlic, minced
  • pinch oregano
  • pinch salt and pepper
  • 1/2 tsp cumin

Heat a small sauce pan on low flame, when hot add oil. Saute garlic on low for about 2 minutes, do not brown. Add sour orange, oregano, cumin, salt and pepper and let it come to a boil. Shut off and set aside to cool to room temperature.

82 comments :

  1. Yum! I love that these are not fried!

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  2. Oh Gina this looks so good, thank you for sharing this. Oh and I sure won't tell your daughter, lol! Have a great day.

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  3. WOW...love your blog. So glad I found it. I'm a follower now!

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  4. Oh, SO making this.

    Seriously, I have to tell ya, I love your blog. There are few that have recipes every week that I want to make. Thanks so much for doing what you do!

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  5. @aleta meadowlark I love yours too! We have similar food tastes I see!

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  6. I am new to your site and have to say it's great! I will definitely be frequenting your blog, often!

    What would happen if you used ripe plantains with this recipe. WOuld it work. I have 3 sitting on my counter.

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    1. Yes it does. And they get a nice caramelized color, too! Just spray plaintain with pam spray and pop in the oven.

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  7. Hi Lori,
    Ripe plantains are sweet and aren't used for tostones. I'm not sure how they would come out since they are usually a lot softer. I will post recipes for ripe plantains this week.

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  8. I love tostones, but have never tried baking them! They look as good as the fried ones, and the sauce sounds amazing!

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  9. Actually, you can make fried plantains with yellow plantains; they are great as a dessert item with cinnamon sugar (or maybe cinnamon and Splenda?) on them. I'm going to try baking them and see what happens. Thanks for posting this, Gina!

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  10. Yes, you can use yellow ones, or even better, when they turn almost black (super sweet). The healthiest way to make them is to bbq them or bake them in the oven. You cut the ends off, and cut them in half. Put them on the grill on a low flame turning constantly and they cook in about 20 minutes. No oil added. You can always add a little brown sugar and cinnamon if you wish at the end.

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  11. OMG, COMING FROM A CUBAN HOUSEHOLD, YOU KNOW TOSTONES ARE A MUST FOR ANY MEAL! I CAN'T WAIT TO TRY THE BAKED ONES, THEY LOOK EXACTLY THE SAME!!!! THANKS...

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  12. Trust me Odalis, from a Colombian househould... and hubby is half Puerto Rican... They are awesome!

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    1. I MUST SAY I LOVE YOUR BLOG AND EVEN MORE SO THAT I SEE YOU ARE COLOMBIAN AS WELL..I AM COLOMBIAN AND MY HUSBAND IS MEXICAN AND WE CANT WAIT TO TRY ALL THE GREAT RECIPES!!!
      THANK YOU FOR MAKING IT OK TO STILL EAT SOME YUMMY LATIN FOOD AND NOT FEEL GUILTY!!! :)

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  13. I love tostones thanks for your recepie. I've never had it with the Mojo sauce but in Puerto Rico we use MayoKetchup. Yes, it is what the name implies, but the difference is you add a clove of garlic to the mix a voila! It's also very good with tostones. You can use light mayo and make it low fat :)

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  14. I'm in love! Skinny jeans, here I come.

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  15. I tried these over the weekend and they were fabulous!! Loved them, especially with that mojito

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  16. @ Eli, yes! These are fab, especially with mojitos!!!

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  17. I am looking forward to trying the oven baked patacones, versus the fried ones. My question is, are the points for one patacon? What is the serving size? Thanks!

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  18. Serving size is 3/4 of a plantain. So if you make 3 plantains like in the recipe, divide equally amongst 4 people. It's a generous portion :)

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  19. These were great, had them with guacamole and you can't even tell the difference. Loved them!

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  20. i made some today and it was better then the fried! definately a good idea!...yummm!

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  21. Oh my! My family loves tostones and I searched the internet for how to bake them. We learned to bake empanadas and they are awesome. Thank you for saving the platanos in our kitchen. Can't wait to try this tonight!

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  22. Wow I am so excited to try these! I love patacones! But hate using so much oil. I had been wondering if they could be baked and you have answered my question! Thanks so much! :)

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  23. I love Tostones a lot! If you are from el Caribe like me (Dominican), you grow up eating them almost everyday! Thanks so much! I will give them a try!

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  24. I grew up eating them too. Moms Colombian but I have family in many countries, including Dominican Republic. Love it!!

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  25. So happy to find this recipe! My hubby is half Puerto Rican and his uncle (full puerto rican) cooks the BEST things including these! I took detailed notes last time we visited on how to cook the fried ones (along with puerto rican rice and lechon) but this is a great healthier alternative!

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  26. Puerto Rican food is so good, but not usually light! I love lechon! Especially the crispy skin. So fattening though!! Give these a try, they are great.

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  27. OMG thanks you so much Gina!!! I am haitian and we cook fried plantains all the time. But this was so quick and easy. My niece loved it so much and my daughter was crying for more. THANK YOU FOR THIS!!!

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  28. You're welcome! They really are easier than frying! Thanks for commenting!!

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  29. These are terrific! We serve Venezuelan style - topped with a mixture of shredded cabbage and carrots tossed with tres salsas (ketchup, mayo, mustard and worcestershire sauce). It's like a little bundle of coleslaw on top. Really delicious! Thanks so much for this baked recipe.

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  30. Gina,
    Made these last night and my Cuban hubby LOVED them. They fry in so much oil in Cuba; it's nice to still be able to enjoy all the great food in a healthier way.
    On a side note, I also bake the ripe plantains; cut side up in a baking dish, bake for about 10 minutes, then put picadillo (already cooked) on top, sprinkle with a bit of cheese and bake for another 15-20 minutes; like a lasagna.

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  31. Andria, that sounds scrumptious!

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  32. Ohhh, this looks so good, but I went to the grocery store and I couldn't find plantains! Is it because they're not in season? Or are they not regular grocery store fare? If I can't find them at all, is it possible to make them with bananas? (Please excuse my ignorance, not only do I not usually cook, but I'm also Irish/German. Unless it's a potato, I don't know anything about it!)

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  33. That's funny! I always find them near the banana section. I would ask your grocer to see if they carry them. I think you can find them easily in most states. Bananas would not work here.

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  34. Tried the recipe last night and I am sorry say that the Tostones came out very had and did not compare to fried tostones. Maybe you have some suggestions as to what might have gone wrong. I follow the recipe for the most part but cooked them a litter more time to brown them.

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  35. Great recipe! Love the mojo sauce!

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  36. My father is Cuban and has eaten tostones all his life. Regrettably, he did not like the recipe and complained that the tostones were too hard and did not compare with fried tostones and I agree. Some health recipes are well intentioned but never come close to the real thing - this is one of them. Sorry folks but you'll have to fry some plaintains to get the unadulterated true taste of tostones.

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  37. I was born and raised in PR for 26 years before coming to the states 4 years ago, so you might say I have eaten my fair share of tostones in my life. I tried this baked version tonight and it turned out so much better than expected. As other reviewer mentioned, we eat tostones with MayoKetchup with mashed garlic. They go perfectly together! I think they did come up a bit drier (they are not soaked in oil!) but with the sauce you don't even notice. Thanks for posting Gina! I can't wait to teach my Puerto Rican family how to eat platanos in a more healthy way! :-)

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  38. For those of you who thought they were too dry, you could always toss them with a little more olive oil. Still better than frying!!! I've made these many times since posting, don't cut them too thin, they won't work and don't overcook them or they will get dry.

    It takes a little trial and error with your oven, but when you get them right, they are perfect!!

    Linda- so happy a native Puero Rican gave these the thumbs up!! I have a delicious dipping sauce my mom makes I will share with you soon. It's garlicky and healthy at the same time!!

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  39. Hi Gina,
    I've been cooking your recipes all week. Tonight was Taco Chili. Delish!
    Was wondering....now that all fruits are free, would these plaintain chips be zero points if we eliminated the dip? Also, I'm thinking of sauteeing some plantains in Pam with a little cinnamon and agava syrup. What do you think?

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  40. Jennifer, plantains are not 0. Just put this in recipe builder, assuming it's 3 cups, then it's 4 points per serving.

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  41. Gina, I made these and they almost have the consistency and taste of a really dry potato. The outsides are very crispy so I know I cooked them enough, and I've had them before and know they shouldn't taste like this. What went wrong? I'm wondering if I just didn't buy good plantains!

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  42. The plantains should be very green. And they should be cut exactly into 1/2 inch thick slices to get the right size.

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  43. Genius! Gracias

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  44. I'm planning to make these for a party... can they be made a day or two ahead of time and reheated in a low oven?

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  45. These are best when eaten fresh out of the oven. I dint recommend reheating.

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  46. Hello Gina!!! I have been making these at home for years now from your site (for my picky Cuban/ Puerto Rican Fiancee, and he loves them! : ) I'm italian and have a lot to learn about spanish food. Since I was introduced to Mofongo last year in Puerto Rico, I have been dying to find a low cal way to make it! Any suggestions?

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  47. Gina, I just started doing WW and someone in our meetings recommended your page. I'm really impressed! Can't wait to make some (actually, many) of your recipes.
    I'm Puerto Rican, born and raised (so is my husband and kid). We just moved to Northern VA four years ago. I actually made tostones 2 weeks ago for a dinner party at our house, so I'll be making these to see how goes. Instead of garlic in our MayoKetchup, we use tabasco sauce to add a little zing.
    As Lisa asked, I would love a skinny mofongo recipe!
    Help us!
    CR

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  48. Lisa and Christina, I've attempted skinny mofongo but some things just don't lighten well. I didn't care for it.

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  49. oh, well...

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  50. If I'm not mistaken I've heard of some variation of these being used as bread for a type of Cuban sandwich (Where instead of flattening them in slices, the entire plantain was flattened lengthwise). I believe i was it on a Cooking Channel show but I didn't bother making note of it as I didn't think there would be a way to make it healthy and retain the original flavor. I'm going to have to consult the Google now.

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  51. I think it would be hard to bake a whole one flattened, but yes, you can do it with a fried one. I've often fantasized about a steak sandwich on tostones! You can certainly use these for bite sized sandwiches!

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  52. Hey Gina!

    I was wondering what the calories of the dip were?

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  53. 30 calories per serving for the mojo

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  54. So excited I found a baked tostones recipe. Thank you very much I hate frying so this is perfect. The dipping sauce I like with these is real simple...definitely for garlic lovers. I don't measure but if I had to guess use about half cup vegetable oil, mash 3-4 cloves of fresh garlic into the oil. Add some dried oregano about half- 1tsp. Add white vinegar about 1tbsp then salt&pepper to taste refrigerate for about an hour. I also put some of this over my white rice and meats as well. Again I don't measure but just tweek to your tastebuds.

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  55. Just made these. They were surprisingly good! I really didn't miss them being fried twice.

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  56. Made these tonight and was surprised how good they were. I think I will make them a little thicker next time and try them with the dipping sauce.

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  57. Karina Cortes1/12/12, 6:39 PM

    You are officially my cooking hero! I love platanos and thought I would have to give them up! Bravo!

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  58. What are the calories for the tostones?

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  59. Gina I am absolutely in love with your recipes, I visit the page almost everyday!

    I'm eager to try this recipe and I was wondering if it would work as well with extra virgin olive oil as well? Or would the amount of oil have to be increased?

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  60. I am so excited to try this! I was wondering how many calories there was for the baked plantains. I am not on WW, so I don't really understand the point system. Thanks SO much!

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  61. Gina, My Mother-in Law cooks the Plantain first in the Microwave, then sliced them and proceeds to fry them...I'll try to put them in the oven and see the results! I'm also from P.R.!!!!

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  62. I just made these but I used the tostonera that pokes the hole in the middle and filled them with your chicken ropa vieja recipe. Absolutely fantastic. Love your site, Gina. Keep these great recipes coming! :-)

    -Marly

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  63. About 1/3 of my plantains got burnt to a crisp, so next time, when I have more time to watch them in the oven, I'm going to put them in for less time. So since I don't own a tostonera, I thought I'd try using my burger slider maker, which is a little press. I could only flatten 2 at a time, but I'm thinking it had similar results for what Gina had and was pretty easy to use/clean up. I tried Badia Sour Orange instead of orange juice and I'm curious how that might have effected the taste vs. regular OJ. The plantains that did not burn were very good. :)

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  64. Does anyone know the calorie count?? on the Tostones, once there backed ?? and read to eat? thank you

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  65. I just made these!! Yummy!!!

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  66. Nervous but going to give these a shot tonight. Are they supposed to be crispy like a plantain chip? Or more soft in the center???

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  67. Seriously, you are brilliant. We have Dominican Abuela living with us and her tostones are AWESOME, but the oil oozes out of them. I'm going to make these for her and see if I can fool her. Tostones are the best thing EVER!

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  68. ADM (OMG) Cuban/ Colombian household over here trying to cut back on fat and calories and this is a God send, a meal without patacones or maduros is not a meal according to my husband, hope I can trick him :)

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  69. OMG
    Made this last night along with the black bean salad and roast pork I luv tostones andI have tried to make them before and it was a flop BUT these came out great I did have trouble peeling them but hopped on internet and found a video Yumm-o

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  70. Hi Gina, I LOVE your blog and my whole family is so much happier with my cooking thanks to you!
    I was wondering if I can freeze the tostones for a few days after smashing them and bake them the second time right before I serve them.
    Thanks
    Maritza.

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  71. Made these tonight. Maybe I did something wrong but they were nothing close to the fried version, barely even edible. As a Puerto Rican lover of tostones, I will continue to fry them. I will simply eat them in moderation.

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  72. So glad I just found these. I saw tostones in the picture with the Picadillo and thought "That sounds like such a good combination.. I wonder if Gina has a healthy version." Thank you!

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  73. making these tonight, and I'm not familiar with the points system. I was curious as to how many calories they are?

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  74. I LOVE tostones! My family is from Haiti and we call these "banane pèse". My mom always makes it for me when I'm craving my favorites. I rarely make it since it's fried but you have saved me! By the way, I made your chicken enchiladas last week. So yummy.

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  75. YUM! I love tostones, we eat them with salsa and it is a wonderful combination. I was wondering if the plantains should be soaked in salt water? If I remember correctly, my FIL, a Puerto Rican, either soaks or boils them, then smashes then fries. Does that sound right to you? Maybe soaking would help with the dryness? No matter, when you scoop some salsa, it's all gravy ;0). Thanks so much Gina, you make staying on plan enjoyable.

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  76. Ahhhh! I just discovered your blog today and I'm so excited that you have all these healthier versions of latin foods. I cook for my dad a lot (he's Nicaraguan) and feel guilty about giving him so much fried stuff - this will really help! Thank you!

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  77. I made the dipping sauce but didnt boil it. I had extra leftover that I marinated pork chops in and grilled them. So delicious

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